Street food in Bulgaria and the Balkans: 8 regional snacks you must try

Street food in Bulgaria and the Balkans: 8 regional snacks you must try

Reasonably priced, ready-to-eat and with an unmistakable local flavour, street food is ubiquitous around Bulgaria and the Balkans. In fact, snacks might be the perfect introduction to the glories of Balkan food and Bulgarian cuisine in particular! Street food is available just about everywhere around the region, and of course particularly so in the cities and in major tourist destinations. So no need to worry while you’re exploring this enchanting corner of south-eastern Europe: you’re guaranteed a vast choice of delicious oriental finger food in-between meals!

Classic Balkan and Bulgarian street food has been heavily influenced by the centuries of Ottoman rule, so its taste will often remind you of Turkey and its rich culinary tradition – but always with a local twist depending on the country and region, the local climate and customs. And like almost everywhere, you’re likely to find local versions of Western street foods like pizza, hamburgers, doughnuts and sandwiches in the Balkans too – but you’d be surprised how different those can be from the originals sometimes!

From the world’s favourite late-night wrap to seeds as addictive as hard drugs, kashkaval tourist presents street food in Bulgaria and the Balkans: 8 regional snacks you must try!

1. World-famous meat cone: döner and gyros

World-famous meat cone: döner and gyros

World-famous meat cone: döner and gyros

Whether you call it döner, gyros or shawarma, this is perhaps the most recognized street food to come out of this part of the world. 🥙 Originating in 19th-century Ottoman Anatolia, döner kebab is now omnipresent in all Balkan countries – and it has expanded throughout Europe and beyond, conquering basically the entire world! This heavenly combo of seasoned meat (chicken, beef or lamb), slow-roasted as a humongous cone on a rotating vertical spit and then wrapped in bread with some salad and sauce, is an entire meal in itself.

In Bulgaria, dyuner (дюнер) is often sold by Turkish or Arabic immigrants, though it features some typically local quirks too. A Bulgarian dyuner will often be stuffed with French fries, which is a rarity in other places, and it will always be served wrapped in soft, thin flatbread, never as a sandwich. Chicken is by far the most popular variety and beef is to be found in the more respected döner joints, though lamb is a true rarity. The Greek version gyros is also quite beloved: it’s notable for its thicker bread and particularly for offering pork as an option.

  • Standard price in Bulgaria: 3-5 BGN (1.5-2.5 €)

2. Breakfast besties: börek, burek and banitsa

Breakfast besties: börek, burek and banitsa

Breakfast besties: börek, burek and banitsa

Known as börek in Turkey, burek throughout former Yugoslavia and banitsa in Bulgaria, this flaky filled pastry is an absolute hit throughout the Balkans, be it as a breakfast staple or as a late-night snack. Prepared of multiple sheets of super thin filo dough, this piece of baked deliciousness 😌 is usually filled with various ingredients. In Bulgaria, the quintessential street banitsa includes sirene (white cheese) and/or curd. In former Yugoslavia, burek is more commonly filled with ground meat.

As a fast food, banitsa is sold by small bakeries that you can find on almost every busy street corner. In addition to this layered Balkan specialty, these bakeries also sell other local pastries and some Western-inspired varieties like strudel (which, in Bulgaria, is often basically a sweet banitsa with an apple flavour). In eastern Bulgaria and the Turkish-populated regions, bakeries also offer gözleme, a related filled pastry, which unlike börek is unleavened and cooked on a griddle.

  • Standard price in Bulgaria: 1-2 BGN (0.5-1 €)

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7 unique Bulgarian wine varieties you must taste

7 unique Bulgarian wine varieties you must taste

Did you know that Bulgaria was the second largest producer of wine in the world in the 1980s? Today, the country may not be producing wine on such a massive scale, but its thousand-year-old winemaking traditions continue to deliver high-quality and affordable Bulgarian wine.

Indeed, vine growing and winemaking have been part of Bulgarian culture since time immemorial. Thousands of years ago in what is today Bulgaria, the ancient Thracians were consuming wine from elaborate gold vessels in the shape of animals and mythical creatures. And who wouldn’t grow wine in Bulgaria – its sunlit hills, fertile soils and geographic latitude (equivalent to central Italy or southern France to the west) provide the perfect vine growing conditions practically all over the country.

Wine is among the most popular drinks in Bulgaria, along with rakia and beer. The country is divided into five separate winemaking regions, each of those offering specific local wines. From the spicy Mavrud of the central south to the fresh Gamza of the northwest, I present you 7 unique Bulgarian wine varieties you totally must taste!

1. The dark horse: Mavrud

Mavrud’s name comes from the Greek word for black and you can definitely see why in this wine’s deep colour. Used to make a dark ruby-coloured and soft-tasting wine, Mavrud (Мавруд) grapes are almost exclusively grown in a small area just north of the charming Rhodope Mountains. More specifically, this sturdy variety is associated with the town of Asenovgrad and to a lesser extent with Perushtitsa.

Mavrud grapes are typically small in size, low on yield and ripen late – the harvest is in late October. All these factors result in a spicy and fruity varietal with high tannins, appreciated for its high quality, remarkable maturing potential and local character.

2. Flavour of the Mediterranean: Broad-Leaved Melnik

The scenic region of Melnik produces well-aging reds

The scenic region of Melnik produces well-aging reds. Photo credit: Dupnitsa.net, Wikipedia.

Planted in the southwestern-most and warmest corner of Bulgaria, in the distinct Mediterranean valley of the Struma River, the Broad-Leaved Melnik Vine (Широка мелнишка лоза, Shiroka melnishka loza) bears all the signs of an age-worthy southern red grape variety. Varietals are often named just Melnik, referring to the picturesque smallest town in Bulgaria famous for its winemaking tradition.

According to a very popular story, Melnik wine was Winston Churchill’s favourite – it is even claimed that Churchill had 500 litres of this wine delivered to him annually! Whether this is true or not, it is certain that wine from the late-ripening Broad-Leaved Melnik grapes has a captivating taste much like that of Châteauneuf-du-Pape of southeastern France, often with tobacco and leather hints.

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10 Bulgarian drinks you must try

10 Bulgarian drinks you must try

Bulgaria has a refreshing tradition of natural beverages, both alcoholic and non-alcoholic. Many Bulgarian drinks are mixed together to create curious cocktails while others, like the classic rakia, are sipped pure. With summer slowly approaching and the weather getting sunnier and warmer by the day, here’s a list of 10 typically Bulgarian drinks to quench the thirst when you visit the country… and enrich your cultural experience of the Balkans!

1. The fruity queen of spirits: rakia (ракия)

The fruity queen of spirits: rakia (ракия)

The fruity queen of spirits: rakia (ракия)

A personal favourite and the most popular spirit among the South Slavic peoples, rakia is a fruit brandy that can be made out of practically any kind of fermented fruit. This legendary beverage is customarily made in home distilleries (called казан kazan). In Bulgaria, the most popular variety is grape rakia, though plum, apple, apricot, peach, cherry, quince are all appreciated and traditional for some regions like Troyan and the western parts of the country. The rose rakia of Kazanlak is another local variety that stands out.

Order a rakia with a shopska salad for the quintessential Bulgarian appetizer. And pay attention to the measures – a small drink in Bulgaria is 50ml while a big drink amounts to a whooping 100ml! Commercially-made rakia has an alcohol content of about 40% and the home-made spirit is even stronger, so a big drink is already a serious undertaking…

2. A healthy chilled yoghurt specialty: ayran (айран)

A healthy chilled yoghurt specialty: ayran (айран)

A healthy chilled yoghurt specialty: ayran (айран)

Bulgarian yoghurt is celebrated worldwide, and within the country it is enjoyed both in its thick and in its liquid form. Mix an equal amount of water with some quality Bulgarian whole-milk yoghurt, stir it and add salt to taste and you get ayran (or ayryan) – served chilled, the ultimate refreshing milk drink for the hot Balkan summers.

Ayran, though in a thicker variety and often with added herbs, is also popular throughout Turkey and the Middle East.

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