Fresh lamb feast and army holiday: happy St George’s Day!

Fresh lamb feast and army holiday: happy St George's Day!

Fresh lamb feast and army holiday: happy St George’s Day!

On 6 May each year, Eastern Orthodox Bulgarians celebrate St George’s Day (Гергьовден, Gergyovden). Because a whole lot of people are called Georgi or Gergana or some variation thereof, this is one of the most widespread name days in the country. And not only that, but it’s a national holiday — it’s been the official Bulgarian Army Day since 1880. The Bulgarian armed forces parade their best units and military equipment in central Sofia.

As St George is also the patron day of shepherds, it’s an old Bulgarian tradition that lamb must be eaten on St George’s Day, a custom which may stem from ancient pagan sacrificial rituals. Many Bulgarian families purchase a whole lamb before 6 May and have a huge feast with delicious lamb meals and a fresh green salad on the side on that day.

9 extraordinary bridges in the Balkans

9 extraordinary bridges in the Balkans

For centuries, bridges have connected the cities and nations of the Balkans over rivers, gulfs and valleys… and in rare cases, over no obstacle whatsoever. Some Balkan bridges have become symbols of unity, while others have been a cause for division – after all, World War I practically started on a small bridge in Sarajevo!

Whatever their story or peculiarity, it is without doubt that these bridges have left a mark on the region. From the place where the love padlock tradition started to the world’s tallest railway viaduct, kashkaval tourist presents 9 extraordinary bridges in the Balkans.

1. Nobel Prize winner: Bridge on the Drina in Višegrad, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Nobel Prize winner: Bridge on the Drina in Višegrad, Bosnia and Herzegovina

Nobel Prize winner: Bridge on the Drina in Višegrad, Bosnia and Herzegovina

If the Bridge on the Drina sounds somehow familiar to you, it must be because of Yugoslav novelist Ivo Andrić’s eponymous masterpiece. In the novel, Andrić manages to capture a microcosm of the Balkans by telling the story of the bridge from early Ottoman times till World War I.

Actually named the Mehmed Paša Sokolović Bridge, this 16th-century stone structure is a work of art on its own. Designed by famous Ottoman architect Sinan, the bridge has 11 gentle arches and spans a total of 180 metres over the waters of the Drina in Višegrad, eastern Bosnia.

2. Bridge with shops inside: Covered Bridge in Lovech, Bulgaria

Bridge with shops inside: Covered Bridge in Lovech, Bulgaria

Bridge with shops inside: Covered Bridge in Lovech, Bulgaria. Photo credit: Klearchos Kapoutsis, Flickr.

Hanging over the Osam River in north central Bulgaria, Lovech’s Covered Bridge is a remarkable engineering oddity. Today’s pedestrian bridge was constructed in 1982 as an accurate replica of legendary architect Kolyu Ficheto’s creation from 1876. And while the original featured 64 tiny workshops used by the craftsmen of Lovech, the modern version boasts the variety of three workshops, nine souvenir shops and two cafés serving traditional confectioneries.

The Covered Bridge in Lovech is one of the few commercial covered bridges in the world. It has become an emblem for the quaint Bulgarian town much like its Swiss counterpart, the Kapellbrücke in Lucerne.

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Listen to the captivating Bulgarian History Podcast!

Did you know that Bulgaria’s decisive help saved Constantinople — and most likely all of Europe — from Arab conquest in the 8th century? Eric Halsey knows and wants to tell you about it.

bghist-logoEric, an American from the suburbs of Washington, D.C., fell in love with Bulgaria so much that he is dead set on living in and exploring the country. Together with his Bulgarian partner Martin Christov, Eric records and publishes The Bulgarian History Podcast: a fascinating series providing an insight into Bulgaria and the Balkans’ dramatic history.

Eric and Martin aim to both increase knowledge of Bulgarian history as well as to get people to think more critically about it — after all, truth is a relative concept, especially in Balkan historiography. This makes the Bulgarian History Podcast perfect for English speakers who want to know more about our region’s volatile past.

With six episodes already released and many more to come, Eric’s podcast provides for captivating and informative listening. Give it a shot and learn about Bulgarians’ arrival to the Balkans and their epic wars with Byzantium!